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7 Most Popular Twitch CopyPasta

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According to all known laws of aviation, there is no way a bee should be able to fly. Its wings are too small to get its fat little body off of the ground. The bee, of course, flies anyway because bees don’t care what humans think is impossible. Yellow, black. Yellow, black. Yellow, black. Yellow, black.

If you have spent a fair amount of time on Twitch, you have most likely have seen this exact block of text above posted in a streamer’s chat. This is the opening few lines from the script of Bee Movie, which has become a rather popular meme over the last few years. This is one of countless random messages you may find scattered across Twitch, which leads up to the following question: What is a CopyPasta, and why do people post them?

What Is a Twitch CopyPasta?

A CopyPasta is a block of text which is copied and pasted widely across the internet. It often originates from meme culture or a lengthy forum post. On Twitch, it is most often spam or something to do with a popular meme, but it will sometimes relate to inside jokes within a specific Twitch community. Spamming chat with nonsense might seem fun, but it can definitely get annoying so be cautious if you decide to partake.

arrybo twitch

Top CopyPastas for Twitch 

Twitch has been around since 2011, so there have been plenty of legendary CopyPastas that have become widely known across the platform. However, memes don’t always age well, so what we have listed below are examples of the most common CopyPastas you can find in Twitch chat today:

  1. 1. ASCII Art

    ASCII Art Shrek

    Text art, also known as ASCII art is without a doubt the most common message you may find copy and pasted into a Twitch chat. There are dedicated websites that allow users to copy the desired picture to their clipboard for easy distribution. They are usually considered annoying and unnecessary messages, as they take up a ton of space and make it hard for the streamer to read their chat. Sometimes these pictures contain profanity and are vulgar enough to conflict with either chat rules or Twitch’s Terms of Service. Posting ACSII art will often result in your message being deleted, maybe a short timeout, or perhaps even a ban from the channel.

  2. 2. Among Us

    .  。    •   ゚  。   .   .      .     。   。 .  .   。  ඞ 。  . • . [Enter name] was ejected. . .   。 .     。      ゚   .     . ,    .  .   .

    This CopyPasta is a bit more recent, but it is still a very common message to find in a Twitch chat due to the recent popularity of Among Us. It represents the in-game action of voting a specific player out of the game and sending them into space. Users of this CopyPasta are supposed to replace the “[Enter name]” with someone else’s name before posting in chat.

  3. 3. Malta vs Penguins

    This does not change the fact that in Antarctica there are 21 million penguins and in Malta there are 502,653 inhabitants. So if the penguins decide to invade Malta, each Maltese will have to fight 42 penguins.

    This statement is usually posted randomly, but it is light-hearted and will most likely spark an interesting conversation that would predict the outcome of this theoretical battle.

  4. 4. Rick Astley Paradox

    If you ask Rick Astley for a DVD of the movie Up, he won’t give it to you because he’s never gonna give you Up. However, by not giving you Up like you asked for it, he’s letting you down. This is known as the Astley paradox.

    Here’s another fun message to think about, as it combines two highly recognizable pieces of media in pop culture, being the movie Up and the song Never Gonna Give You Up by Rick Astley.

  5. 5. Tanner from High School

    So you’re going by “[Enter name]” now nerd? Haha what’s up d***** bag, it’s Tanner from Highschool. Remember me? Me and the guys used to give you a hard time in school. Sorry you were just an easy target lol. I can see not much has changed. Remember Sarah the girl you had a crush on? Yeah we’re married now. I make over 200k a year and drive a mustang GT. I guess some things never change huh loser? Nice catching up lol. Pathetic..

    Oddly specific and a bit aggressive, isn’t it? The earliest usage of this message was directed at popular Twitch streamer “loltyler1”, and has been posted on various websites across the internet after that.

  6. 6. Now Playing

    twitchquotes now playing

    I’ve seen this message popping up a lot recently. Using a bunch of symbols, it is meant to resemble a music player, and is a pretty clever way of letting somebody know that …nobody asked.

  7. 7. Chat Pyramids

    twitchquotes 2

    There are a few variations of this one, so the emote and noun can be swapped out for whatever you want, but another trend as of late is to try to build pyramids containing the same emote in chat.

How Does a CopyPasta Get Popular?

A good CopyPasta can catch on like wildfire. It is quite easy for a viewer to start a CopyPasta chain, as copy and paste are two of the most common commands used by computer and smartphone users, meaning just about anybody can join in. If a viewer is pleased with the outcome of the CopyPasta chain, (whether it’s supposed to be funny, random, malicious or anything in between), chances are that they will bring it into a new channel to see how another creator reacts.

It is even easier to do this now because there are a select number of Twitch channels with access to Chants. This feature gives content creators and moderators who use the “/chant” command in chat to suggest messages in the chat. Viewers simply have to click the “Chant” button to join in on the party and post the suggested message in chat.

twitch nolski started a chant

Conclusion

Though sometimes random and out of control, chat is an essential part of the Twitch experience. The first known CopyPasta was recorded back to 2006, meaning people have been doing this sort of stuff on the internet for over 15 years now. It is no surprise that it has found its way onto Twitch.

About the Author

Nolan

Nolan, who also goes by Nolski, is a game developer and Twitch streamer from New York. He is passionate about content creation and loves making meaningful connections with anybody he gets to meet!

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